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Monday, December 6, 2021

Finals Study Break: Thursday, December 9!

Come out this Thursday, December 9, from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., for a study break before finals! 

Grab some coffee and tasty freshly-baked donuts outside of the Riesenfeld Rare Books Center in N30.  The Rare Books Center is on the subplaza, at the end of the hallway past the Student Orgs in N20.

When: Thursday, December 9, 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Where: Outside the Riesenfeld Rare Books Center (N30, subplaza level). 
What: Coffee and donuts!

Good luck on finals, and best wishes for the holidays from the Law Library!



Wednesday, November 24, 2021

Rare Books Collection: A Rare Volume of Cherokee Laws

The Riesenfeld Center has a strong collection of American Indian law, with holdings of treaties concluded between the United States government and native tribes in the nineteenth century. Featured in the collection are also letters, petitions, reports, and other communications between various tribes and the federal government; constitutions and laws made by native communities; and other publications that deal with important questions related to sovereignty, land rights, and internal organization, among others. Together the material chronicles the difficult, often painful, history of relations between American indigenous communities and the government. At the same time, it sheds light on tribal lawmaking, courts, and important aspects of social and political self-determination in the 19th and 20th century.


Among this rich material, laws relating to the Cherokee Nation in particular are varied and notable. Many items reflect attempts by the nation to maintain autonomy and communal land in Indian Territory (IT), today part of Oklahoma, to which most Cherokee were forcibly removed as a result of the Trail of Tears. A collection item (above) that captures the significance of printed law within the Cherokee community is a very rare compilation of laws, produced in 1852 in Tahlequah, IT, the nation's capital from 1839. The laws are printed in the Cherokee language, based on a syllabary developed by the famed Sequoyah, who developed a writing system for the language in the early 1800s. Sequoyah was revered for the work: Cherokee printers published in Cherokee and many Cherokee learned to read it in the 1820s. The printing of laws at Tahlequah began in 1841. From the beginning, legal texts could be found in English and Cherokee, though Cherokee language editions are particularly scarce today. Our 1852 volume, collecting earlier laws, was printed by John Candy and Mark Tyger (Damaga). The translation into Cherokee was likely by Hercules T. Martin together with Joseph Blackbird. In our copy, and as in some family Bibles, the names of one generation of the Fodder family are written out (on left-hand page above), including Sequoyah, who was likely named after the founder of the writing system. The book suggests the personal, familial, and tribal significance that a collection of law could carry, particularly one produced in the Cherokee language. 

   - Ryan Greenwood, Curator of Rare Books and Special Collections  


Original Cherokee syllabary
Original Cherokee syllabary

       

  


     

Monday, October 25, 2021

Wednesday, October 27: Halloween Rare Books Open House!

All are invited to the Riesenfeld Rare Books Center's special Halloween Open House this Wednesday, from 12 p.m. to 3 p.m.! 

Come out to see spooky treasures from our collection (including witch trials, gruesome murders, and tomes about wicked judges), and pick up snacks, drinks, and Halloween candy!

Come out in costume and get a picture on our Tumblr page!

When: Wednesday, Oct. 31st, 12 p.m - 3 p.m.
Where: Riesenfeld Rare Books Center*
What: Rare books, snacks, drinks, candy!


(*The Riesenfeld Center is located in N30 on the sub plaza, past Student Orgs in N20.)



Tuesday, October 5, 2021

Wednesday, October 6: Rare Books Open House!

Come out to the Riesenfeld Center's first rare books open house of the semester, this Wednesday, 12 p.m. to 3 p.m.!

Enjoy snacks and drinks, and see new and favorite treasures from the library's rare books and special collections:

When: Wednesday, October 6, 12 p.m - 3 p.m.
Where: Riesenfeld Rare Books Research Center (Rm. N30 on the Subplaza past N20).
What: Rare books, snacks and refreshments!











Thursday, September 23, 2021

New Exhibit Open House: Tuesday, Sept. 28

All are invited to an open house for a special new Law Library exhibit, which commemorates and celebrates the life and career of Walter F. Mondale:


When: Tuesday, September 28, from 12 p.m. - 4 p.m.
Where: Riesenfeld Rare Books Research Center (N30 - subplaza level)

Cookies, brownies, bagged snacks and drinks will be available. 

Walter Mondale ('56) (1928-2021) left an indelible legacy on the national political landscape. His achievements in Congress, the White House, and in Minnesota are a testament to his great skill, courage, and integrity. The Vice President’s enduring contributions were driven by his vision for a country bound by its commitments to fairness, justice, and opportunity. Mondale’s passing this year marked the loss of a great friend, particularly for the Law School’s wide community. Though we grieve his death, we also commemorate his outstanding life of leadership and service.
 
Through photographs, documents, and quotations, the Law Library’s new exhibit traces the Vice President’s career from his formative years in Minnesota to his service as a U.S. Senator, Vice President of the United States, and as an elder statesman. The exhibit also highlights the Vice President's close relationship with the Law School whose building bears his name. For more than sixty years, Mondale's deep involvement in the life of the Law School reflected his generous commitment to his alma mater, rooted in an unshakeable faith in education as the path to a better society. In the same spirit, the current library exhibit honors Walter Mondale’s monumental career and legacy. 

For more about the exhibit, please see this link.






Wednesday, September 22, 2021

New Library Exhibit: "Commemorating Walter F. Mondale ('56) (1928–2021): A Lasting Legacy"

The Law Library announces a special new exhibit to commemorate  the life and career of Walter F. Mondale, now open in the Riesenfeld Rare Books Research Center:

"Commemorating Walter F. Mondale ('56) (1928–2021): A Lasting Legacy" 

Walter Mondale ('56) (1928-2021) left an indelible legacy on the American political landscape. His achievements in Congress, the White House, and in Minnesota are a testament to his great skill, courage, and integrity. The Vice President’s enduring contributions were driven by his vision for a country bound by its commitments to fairness, justice, and opportunity. Mondale’s passing this year marked the loss of a great friend, particularly for the Law School’s wide community. Though we grieve his death, we also commemorate his outstanding life of leadership and service.
 
Through photographs, documents, and quotations, the Law Library’s new exhibit traces the Vice President’s career from his formative years in Minnesota to his service as a U.S. Senator, Vice President of the United States, and as an elder statesman. The exhibit also highlights the Vice President's close relationship with the Law School whose building bears his name. For more than sixty years, Mondale's deep involvement in the life of the Law School reflected his generous commitment to his alma mater, rooted in an unshakeable faith in education as the path to a better society. In the same spirit, the current library exhibit honors Walter Mondale’s monumental career and legacy. 

By any measure, Mondale’s career was extraordinary. He was appointed Minnesota Attorney General in 1960, the youngest in the country. In 1964, he was appointed to the U.S. Senate seat vacated by Hubert Humphrey and went on to serve twelve years in Congress. In the Senate, Mondale’s legislative efforts helped to usher in a new
Democratic party, focused among other issues on civil rights, consumer rights, education, the environment, and government accountability. As Jimmy Carter’s vice president, from 1977 to 1980, Mondale reshaped the role of the office, helping to guide foreign and domestic policy as perhaps no other vice president before him.
 
Although his 1984 bid for the presidency was unsuccessful, Mondale’s choice of Geraldine Ferraro as his running mate was historic, marking the first time that a woman ran as a major party nominee for vice president. Mondale was later appointed by President Clinton as ambassador to Japan, and remained active in the Democratic party throughout his life. For more than sixty years, Walter Mondale’s deep commitment to the Law School added another bright flame to his legacy. He served as an advisor to the Law School and frequently visited, spoke, and lectured here. In part for those deep and continuing ties, the Law School building was rededicated in his honor in 2001. His personal warmth, care, and involvement at the Law School made him one of its greatest friends and partners. 

For more information about the exhibit, or to schedule a tour, please contact Ryan Greenwood (rgreenwo@umn.edu; 612-625-7323). For more information about Walter Mondale's distinguished Senate career, please see the Library's award-winning digital site. For more about the Law School building, Walter F. Mondale Hall, please see this digital exhibit. For more on Mondale's career and legacy, please see the Law School's spring tribute.

   - Ryan Greenwood, Curator of Rare Books and Special Collections



 




Sunday, September 12, 2021

Celebrate Constitution Day: Wednesday, Sept. 15!

Come out and celebrate Constitution Day in the Law Library!  Stop in the Library Lobby on Wednesday, September 15, for donuts and coffee, and fill out a crossword puzzle about the US Constitution for prizes!  (Bonus: take a selfie with James Madison.)

When: Wednesday, September 15, 11 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Where: Law Library Lobby
What: Donuts, Coffee and a Crossword Contest for Prizes!